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TARANTULAS:Genus Overview
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    TARANTULAS:Genus Overview

    NOTE:NOW ADDED WITH SPECIE PICTURE FEATURE!
    This is a work on progress. I will try my best to fill up any missing picture in the future. Some species are not yet known while some are already extinct. I will appreciate if you will PM me for any additional info. Many thanks!
    Sources:The Tarantula Keeper's Guide (edited text), www.arachnoboards.com(photos), www.google.com(photos), www.goliathspiders.com and my own photos!

    Since marami na talagang nasa Tarantula Keeping, I created this thread for all the would be enthusiasts as well as old timers and new comers alike. This is to give an overview of the different genus and a little bit of information on their habitat et cetera.
    Let's keep them Ts coming, happy hunting!


    Genus Avicularia
    Avicularia are an ideal 'first arboreal' species, considered also as 'entry level' for most would be arboreal enthusiasts. They are not overly aggressive, but are quite nervous. There are several species regularly available but their captive care is similar. All breed fairly easily in captivity and the male can be allowed to stay with the female for several nights to a ensure successful mating. Incubation times vary depending on conditions of temperature etc., but when the young emerge they can be the complete colour negative to the adults having an overall pink body and black toes.

    A classic example: A.versicolor adult vs A.versicolor juvy (A big difference in coloration!)


    Fast growing, they can reach full size within 18 months. Observations of Avicularia spp. in their natural environment (Peru) show that in highly populated areas most of the largest trees are home to a mature female. These areas of rainforest are flooded for up to eight months of the year and specimens can been seen on trees after dusk in their characteristic hunting position. These spiders are also known to be able to 'swim' away from potential attackers, using air trapped between the many bristles covering the body that allows them to float on the waters surface. Known in Spanish as dedo rosado (pink toe), any Avicularia spp. is a welcome addition to any collection. All have a patch of urticating hair on the abdomen but it is of the non-airborne type and rarely used.

    Avicularia natural habitat:


    As with many arboreal genera, lifespan is shorter than that of terrestrial species and Avicularia spp. usually live around 7 - 10 years. A typical arboreal set-up is ideal (tall container, moist substrate and piece of cork bark against one side as a retreat) but good ventilation is considered essential for captive Avicularia spp.

    An ideal setup like below would provide an environment that would mimic its natural habitat. But a simple tall container (usually plastic or acrylic), with cocopeat and a piece of tree bark that most of us use would suffice.


    Some are considered social and will tolerate each other in communal set-ups in captivity if enough food is available. There is some confusion over correct identification of most species so caution is advised when attempting to breed them, making sure that both male and female are of the same species.

    Avicularia pupurea mating:


    Personal Characteristics
    Demeanor: Avicularia are rather a resistive specie, but they are among the most docile tarantulas. Usually nervous, however, and should be dealt with accordingly.

    Handling: They are somewhat difficult to extricate from their enclosures, due to their heavy silken nests. A pencil or chopstick may be used to prod the tarantula without destroying its nest. These tarantulas are usually too small to pick up directly with bare hands. They should be scooped up either in the hands or with a drinking glass. Once handled, they can be somewhat nervous and quite acrobatic. They will move about restlessly, constantly reaching forward and upward.

    Biting: Reports of biting in the last several decades could be counted on one hand. Even if they bite, it is usually a dry bite with no ill effects. It's a warning and nothing more.

    Venom Toxicity: There have been no reports of a bite since in the early nineteenth or early twentieth century, when a plantation worker in Trinidad was bitten. The individual experienced pain and swelling. Was able to return to work within a few days, with no effects.

    Longevity: Males may mature within a year or less, but will live for three to four years. After its ultimate molt, they will live for another six to twelve moths before dying of old age.
    Females on the other hand, live much longer. Around eight years or more in the wild., but in captivity around four to six years.

    Caging and Substrate: Because these tarantulas preferentially live in trees, bushes, tall grass, weeds, or on nearly vertical earthern banks, they generally require a vertical oriented cage in captivity. Because these tarantulas have evolved to live "at altidude", they are much safer in taller cages than the terrestrial tarantulas.

    For avicularias, subrate is not necessarily needed. Although it is common for enthusiasts to use a little substrate for appearance's sake. Merely install a water dish on the floor and they will thrive well.

    Overall: These tarantulas are said to do best with both high humidity and good ventilation. Because these two conditions are more or less mutually exclusive, this is not easily accomplished. A good working system is to use the largest water dish that will fit into the cage to increase humidity, and cover less of the lid to allow more ventilation (In my case, I just punch more holes than usual). Because these tarantulas spend almost all of their time at the top of their cage, they do not miss the floor space occupied by the water dish.

    Here's the FUN PART, click on the specie for its picture. ENJOY!
    List of Avicularia species:
    Avicularia affinis (Nicolet, 1849) — Chile
    Avicularia alticeps (Keyserling, 1878) — Uruguay
    Avicularia ancylochira Mello-Leitão, 1923 — Brazil
    Avicularia anthracina (C.L. Koch, 1842) — Uruguay)
    Avicularia aurantiaca Bauer, 1996 — Peru)
    Avicularia avicularia (Linnaeus, 1758) — Costa Rica to Brazil, the Pinktoe tarantula
    Avicularia aymara (Chamberlin, 1916) — Peru
    Avicularia azuraklaasi Tesmoingt, 1996 — Peru
    Avicularia bicegoi Mello-Leitão, 1923 — Brazil
    Avicularia braunshauseni Tesmoingt, 1999 — Brazil, the Goliath pinktoe
    Avicularia caesia (C. L. Koch, 1842) — Puerto Rico
    Avicularia cuminami Mello-Leitão, 1930 — Brazil
    Avicularia detrita (C. L. Koch, 1842) — Brazil
    Avicularia diversipes (C. L. Koch, 1842) — Brazil
    Avicularia doleschalli (Ausserer, 1871) — Brazil
    Avicularia exilis Strand, 1907 — Suriname
    Avicularia fasciculata Strand, 1907 — South America
    Avicularia gamba Bertani & Fukushima, 2009 — Brazil
    Avicularia geroldi Tesmoingt, 1999 — Brazil
    Avicularia glauca Simon, 1891 — Panama
    Avicularia gracilis (Keyserling, 1891) — Brazil
    Avicularia hirschii Bullmer, Thierer-Lutz & Schmidt, 2006 — Ecuador
    Avicularia hirsuta (Ausserer, 1875) — Cuba
    Avicularia holmbergi Thorell, 1890 — French Guiana
    Avicularia huriana Tesmoingt, 1996 — Ecuador, the Ecuadorian woolly
    Avicularia juruensis Mello-Leitão, 1923 — Brazil, the Yellow-banded pinktoe
    Avicularia laeta (C. L. Koch, 1842) — Brazil, Puerto Rico
    Avicularia leporina (C. L. Koch, 1841) — Brazil
    Avicularia metallica Ausserer, 1875 — Suriname, the White-toe tarantula
    Avicularia minatrix Pocock, 1903 — Venezuela, the Venezuelan redstripe
    Avicularia nigrotaeniata Mello-Leitão, 1940 — Guyana
    Avicularia ochracea (Perty, 1833) — Brazil
    Avicularia palmicola Mello-Leitão, 1945 — Brazil
    Avicularia parva (Keyserling, 1878) — Uruguay
    Avicularia plantaris (C. L. Koch, 1842) — Brazil
    Avicularia pulchra Mello-Leitão, 1933 — Brazil
    Avicularia purpurea Kirk, 1990 — Ecuador, the Ecuadorian purple
    Avicularia rapax (Ausserer, 1875) — South America
    Avicularia recifiensis Struchen & Brändle, 1996 — Brazil
    Avicularia rufa Schiapelli & Gerschman, 1945 — Brazil
    Avicularia rutilans Ausserer, 1875 — Colombia
    Avicularia sooretama Bertani & Fukushima, 2009 — Brazil
    Avicularia soratae Strand, 1907 — Bolivia
    Avicularia subvulpina Strand, 1906 — South America
    Avicularia surinamensis Strand, 1907 — Suriname
    Avicularia taunayi (Mello-Leitão, 1920) — Brazil
    Avicularia tigrina (Pocock, 1903) — Uruguay
    Avicularia ulrichea Tesmoingt, 1996 — Brazil
    Avicularia urticans Schmidt, 1994 — Peru, the Peruvian pinktoe
    Avicularia velutina Simon, 1889 — Venezuela
    Avicularia versicolor (Walckenaer, 1837) — Guadeloupe, Martinique, the Antilles pinktoe
    Avicularia violacea (Mello-Leitão, 1930) — Brazil
    Avicularia walckenaeri (Perty, 1833) — Brazil


    AVICULARIA BASIC CARESHEET
    Housing: Avicularias are arboreal (tree-dwelling) so needs a taller tank than terrestrial species, with room to climb. 10 gallons is sufficient space as long as height is provided. 2-3 inches of peat moss or soil can be used for substrate, and branches and live plants/vines should be provided for climbing. Spiderlings can live in a tall clear plastic container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10 to 40-gallon tank, depending on the number of tarantulas. Some avicularia species can be kept communally in a large, well-planted terrarium with many hiding spots and broad-leaved plants. There should be little or no cannibalism, especially if the tarantulas are about the same size. Height is more important than floor space.

    Temperature: 75-85 F (24-30 C)

    Humidity: 78 to 82%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" legspan may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

    Feeding: Lateralis nymphs for slings, Sub-adult/adult lateralis for adults. Mealworms work too.

    Here's a helpful link on
    ARBOREAL TARANTULA HUSBANDRY
    Last edited by shandman; 10-10-2010 at 09:32 AM.
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    Genus Brachypelma

    Genus Brachypelma
    Of the 20 described species of Brachypelma, sixteen or so species can be readily found in captivity. All are terrestrial/burrowing by nature and most are found throughout Central America (Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatemala and Panama etc).

    Habitat of most Brachypelmas:


    Often referred to as 'pet rocks' in the pet trade due to their docile temperament, they can be very slow growing, taking many years to reach maturity. Some of the longest living tarantulas, there have been reports of individuals living in excess of 30 years so they are definitely a long-term commitment. Some species are considered safe for handling and most make for an ideal beginners choice, adapting well to captivity and relatively hardy.

    The classic "Pet Rock", sometimes not moving for hours or days!


    All possess urticating hair that may cause some irritation but with their placid temperament, most will be reluctant to bite. A typical terrestrial set-up is ideal but should be kept on the drier side but country of origin should be used as a guide when setting up the captive environment. A cork bark/flowerpot retreat is recommended but most species are happy to sit out in the open for long periods making them ideal display animals.



    Eggsacs commonly contain around 500 very small spiderlings.


    Personal Characteristics
    Demeanor: These are extremely docile tarantulas, with a few exceptions of course. B.vagans, B.verdezi and B.annitha are quite the nervous ones and would easily bite. Your classic "living rock" tarantula. At most, they would flick (kick urticating hairs) as a form of self-defense when disturbed. When left alone, they may stand on one spot for hours, even days!

    Handling: Most brachypelmas are very easily handled, they seldom erect their fangs, and then only the first time or two they are picked up. B.smithi and B.albopilosum are the most docile ones. They almost seem to enjoy the attention, but there are some species like B.klaasi, B.auratum and B.boehmei that can be skittish at times and would kick hair more often than other brachypelmas. Care should be taken when handling terrestrial tarantulas, to prevent accidental falls that would be critical for them.

    Biting: Some species like the B.vagans and B.verdezi would easily bite when threatened. Best way is to determine the attitude of your Brachypelma pet so you would know if its tractable or not.

    Venom Toxicitiy: One one report of a wet bite was reported. It was a wet one, and reportedly produced pain and swelling that subsided within a day or two to complete recovery.

    Longevity: These are among the longer-lived tarantulas. Imported, wild-caught, fully grown females have been known to live twenty years or more in captivity. The maximum lifespan in captivity, based on experienced enthusiasts have guessed that they may live for thirty to forty years!

    Here's the FUN PART, click on the specie for its picture. ENJOY!
    List of Brachypelma species:
    Brachypelma albiceps Pocock, 1903 — Mexico
    Brachypelma albopilosum Valerio, 1980 — Costa Rica
    Brachypelma andrewi Schmidt, 1992 — Unknown
    Brachypelma angustum Valerio, 1980 — Costa Rica
    Brachypelma annitha Tesmoingt, Cleton & Verdez, 1997 — Mexico
    Brachypelma auratum Schmidt, 1992 — Mexico
    Brachypelma aureoceps (Chamberlin, 1917) — USA (probably introduced
    Brachypelma baumgarteni Smith, 1993 — Mexico
    Brachypelma boehmei Schmidt & Klaas, 1993 — Mexico
    Brachypelma embrithes (Chamberlin & Ivie, 1936) — Panama
    Brachypelma emilia (White, 1856) — Mexico
    Brachypelma epicureanum (Chamberlin, 1925) — Mexico
    Brachypelma fossorium Valerio, 1980 — Costa Rica
    Brachypelma hamorii Tesmoingt, Cleton & Verdez, 1997 — Mexico
    Brachypelma kahlenbergi Rudloff, 2008 — Mexico
    Brachypelma klaasi (Schmidt & Krause, 1994) — Mexico
    Brachypelma sabulosum (F. O. P.-Cambridge, 1897) — Guatemala
    Brachypelma schroederi Rudloff, 2003 — Mexico
    Brachypelma smithi (F. O. P.-Cambridge, 1897) — Mexico
    Brachypelma vagans (Ausserer, 1875) — Mexico, Central America
    Brachypelma verdezi Schmidt, 2003 — Mexico
    Last edited by shandman; 08-19-2010 at 07:30 PM.
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    Genus Aphonopelma

    Genus Aphonopelma
    With nearly 90 described species, Aphonopelma, Pocock, 1897, is a huge and wide ranging genus throughout North America and parts of Southern America, central America and Mexico.
    Most are semi-desert or scrubland species and are terrestrial burrowers. Most will survive quite happily in captivity without a burrow but a retreat should be provided nevertheless.

    Natural habitats of most Aphonopelma species:


    A typical terrestrial set-up is ideal consisting of a few inches of substrate (kept more on the dry side for this genus, especially the North American species where 60% humidity is adequate), a cork bark / flowerpot hide and an open water dish. See here for more information on housing. All species posses urticating hair and most are slow growing, taking several years to reach maturity.

    Aphonopelma moderatum "Rio Grande Gold" which is often intractable.


    They are long lived (reports of 30+ years aren't uncommon) and they have been known to fast for long periods between moults. Therefore most enthusiasts find them boring at times as a result to their molting intervals, which their striking adult colors make up for it.

    Aphonopelma bicoloratum's striking bold colors are what most enthusiasts go for this Genus.


    Most are rather skittish in captivity but will only occasionally use urticating hair as defence and some can be very particular in their feeding habits. The usual invertebrate prey is ideal supplemented with the occasional defrosted pinkie mouse of piece of raw, lean meat.

    The skittish and nervous Aphonopelma seemani in Blue Form is strikingly beautiful! Most often than not, is advised not to handle.


    Personal Characteristics
    Demeanor: With few exceptions, most Aphonopelma are very mild mannered, the classic "laid-back, gentle giant or pet rock." The one exception would be with A.moderatum, the Rio Grande gold tarantula, which is most frequent extremely defensive.

    Handling: Nearly all North American tarantulas will tolerate handling well, especially after they have become accustomed to being picked up a few times. The only glaring exception would be A.moderatum, which is often intractable.
    Some tropical American species are nevous and hyperactive, that would be A.seemani, and some are actively defensive. Their true personalities should be determined first before any attempts of handling.

    Biting: A few species would bite, and a few would bare their fangs in protest or fear on being picked up. Still, the only exception that stands out is A.moderatum, that generally will bite on most opportunities.

    Venom Toxicity: The venom, is apparently mild or completely inconsequential to humans. Reports usually involve numbness and a tingling sensation rather than swelling and pain. Any symptoms disappears within a few hours. No life-threatening or long-term effects have been reported.

    Overall: Most Aphonopelma make excellent, hardy, docile, and long-lived pets even if sometimes they may be a bit drad. They grow rather slow, which makes up on its beautiful appearance, especially A.bicoloratum and A.moderatum. Females of these amazing genus might live through a major portion of your life, some suspect that females of a few kinds may have life expectancies exceeding fifty years!


    Here's the FUN PART, click on the specie for its picture. ENJOY!
    List of Aphonopelma species
    Aphonopelma anax - "Texas tan tarantula"
    Aphonopelma armada -
    Aphonopelma behlei - "Grand Canyon black"
    Aphonopelma bicoloratum - "Mexican Bloodleg Tarantula"
    Aphonopelma burica - "Costa Rican Chestnut-zebra Tarantula"
    Aphonopelma californicum - "California Black and Brown"
    Aphonopelma caniceps - "Mexican Black Velvet"
    Aphonopelma catemac -
    Aphonopelma chalcodes - "Desert Blond Tarantula"
    Aphonopelma clarki - "Fort Worth brown"
    Aphonopelma cochise -
    Aphonopelma crinita - "Mexican green"
    Aphonopelma duplex -
    Aphonopelma eutylenum - "California Ebony Tarantula"
    Aphonopelma harlingenum - "Harlingen Chocolate Brown"
    Aphonopelma hentzi - "Texas Brown Tarantula"
    Aphonopelma heterops - "Texas brown"
    Aphonopelma sp Hualapai -
    Aphonopelma iodius - "Salt Lake Bounty Brown"
    Aphonopelma joshua -
    Aphonopelma jungi - "Rodeo Black"
    Aphonopelma moderatum - "Rio Grande Gold Tarantula"
    Aphonopelma mojave - "Mojave Desert Dwarf"
    Aphonopelma paloma - "Paloma Dwarf"
    Aphonopelma rusticum - "Arizona Olive"
    Aphonopelma schmidti - "Superstition Mountain Blonde"
    Aphonopelma sp. - "Carlsbad Green"
    Aphonopelma sp. - "New River"
    Aphonopelma seemanni - "Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula"
    Aphonopelma steindachneri -
    Aphonopelma texense - "Texas Starr"
    Aphonopelma vorhiesi - "Tuscan Bronze"
    Aphonopelma wichitanum - "Wichita Mountain Red"
    Last edited by shandman; 08-25-2010 at 02:12 PM.
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    Genus Acanthoscurria

    Genus Acanthoscurria
    With over 35 species described to date, Acanthoscurria (Ausserer 1871), is a large and wide ranging genus found throughout South America. Most are from Brazil but one species (A. antillensis) is found in the West Indies.

    Habitat of most Acanthoscurrias:


    All are large, terrestrial burrowers in their natural habitat but in captivity, most will thrive without one. Good display specimens as they rarely hide themselves away, they are voracious feeders making them a welcome and interesting addition to any collection.

    An acanthoscurria sp from juvy to adult size, making them awesome display pets.


    A standard terrestrial set-up is ideal, using slightly moist substrate, an open water dish and a cork bark or flowerpot retreat (see housing for more information). Average temperatures and humidity percentages are also recommended.



    All possess urticating hair and the species most commonly kept in captivity will readily use them without much provocation. Most are nervous therefore unsuitable for handling.

    Here's the FUN PART, click on the specie for its picture. ENJOY!
    List of Aphonopelma species
    Acanthoscurria altmanni - Schmidt, 2003 (Brazil).
    Acanthoscurria antillensis - Pocock, 1903 (Lesser Antilles).
    Acanthoscurria atrox - "Matto Grosso Redrump"
    Acanthoscurria brocklehursti - F. O. P.- Cambridge, 1896 (Brazil)
    Acanthoscurria chacoana - "Bolivian Salmon" Brèthes, 1909 (Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina).
    Acanthoscurria ferina
    Acanthoscurria geniculata - "Giant White Knee" (C. L. Koch, 1841) (Brazil)
    Acanthoscurria insubtilis - Simon, 1892 (Bolivia).
    Acanthoscurria juruenicola - "Matto Grosso Salmon" Mello-Leitão, 1923 (Brazil).
    Acanthoscurria sternalis - Pocock, 1903 (Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina).
    Acanthoscurria suina - Pocock, 1903 (Argentina, Uruguay).
    Last edited by shandman; 08-20-2010 at 06:53 AM.
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    Genus Pamphobeteus
    The genus Pamphobeteus contains some of the largest terrestrial tarantulas available in the hobby (up to 16 cms legspan). Most are stocky in appearance and colours range from pale brown through to stunning jet black with pink and even blue markings to the carapace (especially found in juvenile specimens).

    Not overly defensive, they are more nervous and will readily kick urticating hair at the slightest disturbance. For this reason, a retreat is beneficial, allowing the spider the security this will provide. Most are voracious feeders and grow relatively fast, their appearance changing quite a lot as they grow. Certain species have a beautiful 'Christmas tree' pattern on their abdomens but this will eventually fade as the spider grows but unfortunately most reach maturity as various shades of brown.



    Males possess tibial apophysis and mating is usually a calm affair, using vibrations and loud stridulation in their courtship. A cricket-based diet is sufficient but they will accept the occasional defrosted pinkie mouse or piece of lean, raw beef. Typical terrestrial set-up is ideal. Cork bark/flower pot hide with a deep substrate of moist compost vermiculite mix.

    A juvenile Phampo sp eating its snack, Superworms!


    Due to their large size, Pamphobeteus spp. Will benefit from a slightly larger than normal cage. Cage height should not be too high as this genera are poor climbers and a fall from even a small height may cause problems.

    A variant phase of P.nigricolor makes this a must have for serious collectors!


    Wide ranging throughout the rainforest regions of South America, average temperatures and humidity are sufficient (75oF / 70%). Breeding can be unpredictable and infertile eggsacs are common. If successful, eggsacs contain several hundred spiderlings.


    Here's the FUN PART, click on the specie for its picture. ENJOY!
    List of Pamphobeteus species
    Pamphobeteus antinous Pocock, 1903 — Peru, Bolivia
    Pamphobeteus augusti (Simon, 1889) — Ecuador
    Pamphobeteus crassifemur Bertani, Fukushima & Silva, 2008 — Brazil
    Pamphobeteus ferox (Ausserer, 1875) — Colombia
    Pamphobeteus fortis (Ausserer, 1875) — Colombia
    Pamphobeteus grandis Bertani, Fukushima & Silva, 2008 — Brazil
    Pamphobeteus melanocephalus
    Pamphobeteus insignis Pocock, 1903 — Colombia
    Pamphobeteus nigricolor (Ausserer, 1875) — Colombia to Bolivia
    Pamphobeteus ornatus Pocock, 1903 — Panama, Colombia
    Pamphobeteus petersi Schmidt, 2002 — Ecuador, Peru
    Pamphobeteus platyomma
    Pamphobeteus spec " San Domingo Goliath"
    Pamphobeteus spec J. Ecuador
    Pamphobeteus spec Colombia
    Pamphobeteus spec "Iquitos" (Peru)
    Pamphobeteus spec Machalla
    Pamphobeteus ultramarinus Schmidt, 1995 — Ecuador
    Pamphobeteus vespertinus (Simon, 1889) — Ecuado
    Pamphobeteus ultramarinus

    Last edited by shandman; 08-21-2010 at 02:35 AM.
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    Genus Theraposa

    Genus Theraposa
    Considered to be the "GIANT" of all tarantulas, the genus theraposa brings the term Tarantula Keeping to Big Proportions! These tarantulas are found in tropical rainforest on slopes and hillsides with reasonable drainage and above the high-water mark in areas that flood.



    Only two species are described in Theraphosa. Both are large terrestrial species requiring larger a than normal-sized container.

    T. apophysis - Venezuela
Similar to T. blondi when adult but spiderlings and juveniles have pink colouration to the metatarsus and tarsus giving this species the common name of pinkfoot goliath.



    Although not as heavily built as T. blondi it may reach a larger size and should therefore be housed in similar conditions. T. apophysis has some of the most irritating urticating hairs of any species and being highly strung and nervous, it will readily use them for defence. Captive breeding of this giant is still rare therefore they still command a high price.

    T. blondi - Venezuela, Brazil, Guyana
T. blondi is the worlds largest recorded species of spider. Males have a greater legspan but are slimmer than the females. Not overly aggressive, the goliath is more nervous but be aware that this species has very irritating urticating hairs that it will throw off at the slightest sign of disturbance. Care should be taken especially when cleaning out the container as the hairs can cause a severe reaction. For their size, mating is usually a rather subdued affair with little risk to the male if both are receptive. Eggsacs contain few eggs (around 70) but the resulting spiderlings are huge, having a 2 cm leg span after their first moult. T. blondi is a ravenous feeder throughout its life and is fast growing.



    The enclosure shouldn't be too high as these spiders like to wander and a fall from a tank wall can prove fatal. Wild caught specimens should be avoided as these seem to take time to settle in captivity and this shouldn't be a problem as there are plenty of captive bred stock available. Can reach up to 25 cm leg span (worlds largest spider) and due to its large size, it requires a larger enclosure. A retreat in the form of cork bark or a half flower pot is a must as this species can take some time to settle in captivity. High humidity is not essential but the substrate should not be allowed to dry out completely. A large open water dish is also a must.

    Personal Characteristics
    Demeanor: Contrary to popular opinion, goliath are neither terribly aggressive nor fierce. In fact, calling them actively defensive might be an overstatement. Their ability to stridulate loudly as a warning is impressive, as is their attack stance when they feel threatened, but these are 90 percent bluff and the keeper need not fear them. As with most tarantulas, they have very poor eyesight and cannot see clearly enough to launch an effective preemptive attack. As huge and formidable as they appear, they would generally much rather beat a hasty retreat than attack or even stand and defend themselves.

    Handling: Goliaths are not the malevolent, wrathful monsters that they are often characterized to be and can be handled or manipulated relatively easily. Even so, enthusiasts seldom do so. There are several good reasons for this. First, adult goliaths are HUGE. Unless they are taught to be handled or manipulated as youngsters (starting about one coffee cup size or smaller) they are big, powerful, unmanageable handfuls (or double handfuls!) with three-quarter-inch (two centimeter) fangs. They are not normally ferocious creatures but could bite if handled carelessly. Handling a spider that size and that well armed can be a daunting experience.



    Here's the FUN PART, click on the specie for its picture. ENJOY!
    List of Theraposa species
    Theraposa apophysis (Tinter, 1991) - Venezuela "Goliath Pinkfoot Tarantula"
    Female
    Male
    Breeding
    T. blondi (Latreille, 1804) - Venezuela, Brazil, Guyana "Brazilian Goliath Tarantula", "Birdeater Tarantula", "Goliath Birdeater Tarantula"
    Female
    Male
    Breeding
    Last edited by shandman; 08-26-2010 at 02:10 PM.
    "To God be the Glory."

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    Genus Megaphobema

    Genus Megaphobema
    Megaphobema is represented by four species and all are large terrestrial spiders ranging from Central and South America. All with thrive in a typical terrestrial set-up (deep substrate to allow for burrowing, cork bark/flowerpot hide and water dish) with average temperatures and humidity.



    M. mesomelas:
A stunning species as adults being overall brown/black with orange/red colouring to the patella of the legs. The black abdomen is clothed with red hairs and the carapace has a velvet-like appearance (some specimens show colour variation and some are more brightly coloured than others). Slightly nervous in temperament, it will benefit from a retreat and enough room to burrow if required although it prefers lower than normal temperatures and humidity. Due to it's desired colour, a much sought after species that remains relatively scarce in collections.



    M. peterklaasi:
Very similar in overall build to M. mesomelas but darker in colouration, the legs having a reddish flash down the metatarsus of all the legs. Again, very velvet-like in appearance and nervous in disposition. Captive breeding is still rare so prices remain high.

    



    M. robustum: A freshly moulted specimen of M. robustum is a striking sight. The entire body is clothed in fiery orange hairs and these are especially apparent on leg iv. A very nervous species that will readily assume a characteristic offensive position with abdomen raised at the slightest disturbance. For this reason a suitable retreat is essential as it needs to feel secure in it's environment. There is wide colour variations within this species and some show very little orange colouration, being simply drab brown even when freshly moulted. A copious hair-kicker, M. robustum will often be completely bald unless rarely disturbed and definitely not recommended for the beginner or handling. Despite their disposition, breeding is usually a calm affair with the male rarely being attacked. It is only recently being bred in any great numbers so still quite sort after, prices remain high.



    M. velvetosoma:
Similar in build to M. robustum but coloured a more uniform brown. A nervous species that with kick urticating hairs readily often resulting in a bald abdomen. A retreat is recommended to make the spider feel more secure. Not often available as captive bred spiderlings, M. velvetosoma is relatively rare in collections due to lack of breeding success.



    List of species
    M. mesomelas (O. P.-Cambridge, 1892) - Costa Rica
    M. peterklaasi Schmidt, 1994 - Costa Rica
    M. robustum (Ausserer, 1875) - Colombia
    M. velvetosoma Schmidt, 1995 - Ecuador
    Last edited by shandman; 08-25-2010 at 08:05 PM.
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    Genus Grammostola

    Genus Grammostola
    Members of the genus Grammostola are indigenous to most of South America and inhabit a wide variety of habitats, from some of the densest jungles to driest deserts. At least 18 species are currently described. Because of this geographic range and the associated habitat variations, each species' requirements are somewhat different from the others. Once cannot assume that they all require the same care.

    Natural habitats of the Chilean Rose tarantula.


    Grammostola rosea, in fact, is an example of one of the extremes, not representative of the group as a whole. G.rosea is easily capable of adjusting to any temperature at which its keeper is comfortable. Almost nothing is known about G.rosea wild habits and lifestyle because few people have ever actually traveled to Chile to see how they live and have brought back reports.

    A RCF (Red Color Form) G.rosea resting on a pile of leaves.


    One might assume that these tarantulas require excessively high temperatures. Not so. They are extremely hardy and resilient animals and will do quite well at normal-room-temperatures. How can a solid black tarantula be so beautiful? Grammostola pulchra sports a glossy jet-black appearance that aficionados love. They are large, hardy and mild mannered, these are strongly recommended for both the novice and the experienced enthusiast. Care for them as an arid species.

    One of the must haves in any tarantula collection, The Brazilian Black tarantula (G.pulchra)


    These are the stereotypic terrestrial burrower tarantulas. The immatures and mature females possess the usual stocky build one grows to expect of a tarantula that spends its life on or in terra firma an must occasionally overpower prey almost its own size to survive. The males possess the light body and long legs that allow it to travel extensively over rough terrain and through plants and brush to find the females and to escape predators.

    Male and Female G.rosea breeding.


    Here's the FUN PART, click on the specie for its picture. ENJOY!
    List of species
    Grammostola actaeon (Pocock, 1903) — Brazil, Uruguay (Brazilian red-rump)
    Grammostola alticeps (Pocock, 1903) — Uruguay (Brazilian Greysmoke)
    Grammostola andreleetzi Vol, 2008 — Uruguay
    Grammostola pulchripes Schmidt & Bullmer, 2001 — Paraguay, Argentina (Chaco Golden Knee)
    Grammostola burzaquensis Ibarra, 1946 — Argentina (Argentinian Rose)
    Grammostola chalcothrix Chamberlin, 1917 — Argentina (Argentina Bronze)
    Grammostola doeringi (Holmberg, 1881) — Argentina
    Grammostola fossor Schmidt, 2001 — Argentina
    Grammostola gossei (Pocock, 1899) — Argentina
    Grammostola grossa (Ausserer, 1871) — Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina (Pampas Tawny-red)
    Grammostola iheringi (Keyserling, 1891) — Brazil (Entre Rios)
    Grammostola inermis Mello-Leitão, 1941 — Argentina
    Grammostola mendozae (Strand, 1907) — Argentina
    Grammostola mollicoma (Ausserer, 1875) — Brazil, Uruguay, Paraguay, Argentina (Brazilian Tawny-red)
    Grammostola monticola (Strand, 1907) — Bolivia
    Grammostola porteri (Mello-Leitão, 1936) — Chile
    Grammostola pulchra Mello-Leitão, 1921 — Brazil (Brazilian Black)
    Grammostola rosea (Walckenaer, 1837) — Bolivia, Chile, Argentina (Chilean Rose)
    Grammostola schulzei (Schmidt, 1994) — Argentina
    Grammostola vachoni Schiapelli & Gerschman, 1961 — Argentina
    Last edited by shandman; 08-26-2010 at 01:50 PM.
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    Genus Chromatopelma

    Genus Chromatopelma

    The Greenbottle Blue Tarantula (Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens), a native of Venezuela, has some of the most dramatic coloring of any spider species. Greenbottles have metallic blue legs, a blue-green carapace and a vibrant orange abdomen.

    They are very active, fast-growing and particularly attractive to tarantula hobbyists.

    These tarantulas live in webbed burrows under bushes and tree roots in desert areas of northern Venezuela, near Paraguana. The entrance is often extended with webbing, sometimes resembling a tunnel. These webs may protect the entrance from the harsh desert climate, also acting as a trap for insects. Green bottle blue's can be very vibrantly blue colored.

    In captivity, this tarantula regularly renews the webbing of its burrow, commonly filling the entire container. It feeds frequently and is a fast-grower. While many are skittish and nervous, some individuals are calm and docile, though running very quickly when disturbed. Some, when distured, are very possessive and show threat displays guarding their burrows.

    This colorful species makes an excellent display tarantula. It's a bit fast and nervous to be considered "docile" in the sense of most Grammostola or Brachypelma, but it is not overly defensive and since it is also hardy and easy to care for it makes an excellent beginner species for those who prefer a hands-off terrarium pet. The key is keeping it dry as it is sensitive to any dampness whether cage moisture, air humidity, or poor ventilation.

    BASIC CARE SHEET
    Size: Spiderlings emerge as 1/2" 1st instar. Adult females may reach 6" in leg span and weigh just over 1 ounce. Males reach 4.5". Growth rate: Medium growth rate.

    Temperature: Keep 80-90F. They can take drops to 65 F for short periods of time as long as they have a deep burrow. Keep your tarantula's enclosure away from windows and sunlight.

    Humidity: 40-60%. Keep substrate mostly dry. Provide
    a shallow water dish. Spray spiderling pill bottles once a week lightly. The substrate should NEVER be "swampy" nor should it dry out, but they do best in an arid environment.

    Habitat type/enclosure/substrate needed: This is a short-burrowing species found in dry forest/ bush areas . Keep adults in 5 gallon tanks with 4-6" peat moss/vermiculite mix.

    Food: Feed prey that is smaller than the length of the tarantulas body. Spiderlings less than 1" leg span will need to be fed mini-meal worms.

    Cleaning: To keep your tarantula's tank clean and keep your animal healthy, get in the routine of feeding your tarantula one day, and then coming behind the next day.

    Longevity: Not much is known about the longevity in this species. Males will probably only live to be 2-4 years old, while females will live over 12 years old.

    Handling/Disposition/Venom: These are somewhat fast and skittish tarantulas. Best advice: Don't handle!


    Here's the FUN PART, click on the specie for its picture. ENJOY!
    List of specie
    Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens (The species was originally described as an Eurypelma in 1907, and was moved to the newly named genus Delopelma by Petrunkevitch in 1939. Both names were later discontinued.)
    Last edited by shandman; 10-10-2010 at 09:39 AM.
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    RESERVED for Genus Tapinauchenius
    Last edited by shandman; 10-10-2010 at 09:11 AM.
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